Posts Tagged “museums”

To Touch or Not to Touch?

by Lori Eggleston. 0 Comments

This week, I hope you don’t mind if I step up on my soapbox for a minute!  The following article was brought to my attention recently, and I think the topic of letting the public handle museum artifacts is worthy of a bit of discussion.  It’s a short article, so go ahead and read it here: http://www.mprnews.org/story/2014/08/11/ok-to-touch-glensheen-home-museums-rethink-rules-to-lure-visitors- Now I certainly understand about incorporating some hands-on exhibits for the visitors.  In ... read more

A Museum by the Numbers

by Lori Eggleston. 0 Comments

One of the requests I get at the museum is for statistics about the museum and the museum’s collection.  Usually the requests are from Museum Studies students, and I am glad to help them.  I do get some of the same questions (but not quite so many of them!) from museum visitors though.  So, based on the questions I hear the most, I thought I’d share a few facts about the National Museum of Civil War Medicine. How big is the museum?     How many artifacts do you have ... read more

Clara Barton’s Bed, Part 2

by Lori Eggleston. 0 Comments

Researching the history of an artifact is one of the favorite aspects of my job, especially when I am able to find new information.  I love being able to discover the story behind an artifact!  Sometimes though, the search is like putting together puzzle pieces, and sometimes my search takes me in directions I didn’t expect.  That’s what happened when I started researching Clara Barton’s Civil War trunk bed a couple of weeks ago.  If you missed Part 1 about this trunk bed, you may want ... read more

When the War is Over

by Lori Eggleston. 0 Comments

There’s a new exhibit at the museum!  Our “Tools of the Trade” exhibit had been in place for five years, so it was time for a change.  We chose to highlight some of the issues faced by the veterans after the war, so the new exhibit is titled, “When the War is Over…The Mental and Physical Legacy of War.”  It is a topic which is sometimes overlooked, and it relates well to some of the issues faced by veterans of more modern conflicts. Before the new exhibit could be installed, I had ... read more

A Beautiful Day at the Pry House!

by Lori Eggleston. 0 Comments

I recently had some tasks to complete out at the Pry House Field Hospital Museum.  The Pry farm is gorgeous this time of year, and I will freely admit that I chose my Pry work day after consulting the weather forecast!  I was able to enjoy a beautiful sunny day there, while still doing my work.     I worked in a room which was closed off from the display areas in the house, so that I didn’t have to worry about the dust or paint fumes affecting the artifacts or the visitors!  ... read more

Civil War Selfies?

by Lori Eggleston. 0 Comments

People who lived during the time of the Civil War may not have had cell phones and digital cameras, but they still had photographs taken of themselves.  The most popular images were not called selfies, but carte de visites (CDVs).  These were small albumen prints which were mounted on cards measuring about 2 1/2 inches by 4 inches.  They were easy to make, inexpensive, and easy to mail.  Soldiers had CDVs taken to send back home to their families and friends, wives sent CDVs of themselves or ... read more

Raising Funds for Clara Barton

by Lori Eggleston. 0 Comments

It’s time for another update on the Clara Barton Missing Soldiers Office!  The building is now open Friday through Sunday each week.  Visitors can tour the restored space where Clara Barton lived and worked while she was running her Missing Soldiers Office.  On the first floor, they can learn more about Washington D.C. in Clara’s time, and about the many ways that Clara made a difference in this world.  On the third floor, they can climb the same staircase, walk the same hallways, look out ... read more

Some Key Facts

by Lori Eggleston. 0 Comments

Last Thursday it was once again time for the annual “History Days” at the Harry Grove Stadium here in Frederick.  Groups of local school children come here to learn more about history at the various booths set up inside the stadium.  They also get to watch the baseball game. As you may suspect, the staff here at the National Museum of Civil War Medicine is always happy to participate in this event!  You can see why in some posts about previous History Days here: http://guardianoftheartifacts.blogspot.com/2012/05/funand-games-much-of-acivil-war.html and here: ... read more

The History of a Surgical Kit

by Lori Eggleston. 0 Comments

Since I work at the National Museum of Civil War Medicine, I’m sure you’d naturally expect that the artifacts in the museum’s collection relate to Civil War medicine.  That is generally true, but there are a few items which may not appear to relate at first glance.  Today let’s take a look at a surgical kit which fits this category.     This kit is a four-tiered general operating set, ca. 1875, manufactured by J. H. Gemrig of Philadelphia.  Though the kit and surgical ... read more

Slow to Heal

by Lori Eggleston. 0 Comments

Part of my job as the curator at the National Museum of Civil War Medicine involves handling the loans of artifacts to other institutions.  I always request photos of the artifacts on exhibit, because I like to see how other museums handle displaying these artifacts.  Sometimes though, I get to actually visit in person.  Recently I had the opportunity to see the new exhibit at the Musselman Library at Gettysburg College.  The curator of the exhibit, Natalie Sherif, had contacted me several months ... read more